Well I feel like I’m going to burst- I’m just so stoked right now!! First the Delica and now Indiegogo has Band Together BC on its homepage!

This is the message they sent me:

Hi Kim.

Congrats! BAND TOGETHER BC is now featured on Indiegogo’s home page thanks to all your great efforts! Share this excitement with your funders and fans. Glad we could give a boost to your efforts.

Congrats!

Thanks to everyone for making this a reality!

Next step…Nominate Band Together on Change Makers BC

Well I tried to add text to the Delica photo, but either wordpress or my tired brain just weren’t having it so here we have post number two. Just try to recall the image of beautiful Delica as you read along…[I later figure it out..see below]

So Band Together BC is officially the proud owner of a slightly used Delica that will soon run on the fruits of your french fries!!!  Suddenly the campaign just got a whole lot more real- which is exciting and I’l be honest a little scary too. But the timing and the people are all aligning so perfectly that I know without a doubt that I am on the right track. Next step: get this baby converted to waste veggie oil and then have some solar installed to power a fridge (it suddenly occurred to me that fresh fruits and veggies might be nice on my journey). My friend Kevin Pegg, Energy Alternatives, has kindly offered to rig up the solar. Add the names of donors to the Delica and I will be all set. I intend to start my journey on July 8 and will post a rough schedule ASAP

The $4000 mark was broken today which means $5000 is right around the corner, which means we’ll be 1/3 of the way there. YES!! 

The generosity and outpouring of support in many lovely forms is flowing, quite overwhelming in fact. Many kind words and acts- like Elly organizing my schedule, Deighen connecting me to all the right people, Nicole giving me nutritional advice, and my dear friend Joe organizing fundraisers all the way in Sierra Leone. This on top of offers to host gatherings and write news articles, to drive the Delica and give me massages. And then there are the generous donations sent from family and friends and strangers too. Wow. Thank you. 

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My heart’s voice rises to speak, and for all I have learned and gained in my life, I would give it all back to keep this place wild. 

Lisa Bland, Wake Up World (http://wakeup-world.com/2012/01/22/pipeline-through-paradise-saving-the-great-bear-rainforest/

This is a beautifully written and evocative piece written by a woman that grew up in the heart of the Great Bear Rainforest. A place that she now carries in her heart.I am excited to speak with her tomorrow about an article she might write on Band Together BC. 

An interesting thing happened to me this evening. I was out on my run when a woman from the Mount Curry Band returned my call regarding the historical and cultural importance of bears in the area to First Nations here (related to an interpretive sign the Get Bear Smart Society will have made for the Callaghan). She told me the story of how a mother bear brought her cubs to the Squamish Lil’wat Cultural Centre when the site was under construction. They wandered through the building and in the First Nations culture, it is understood that the bear had blessed the building. No sooner had we hung up the phone, then I saw my first bear of the season. A large male that likes to hang out at the golf course. He’s a real character and was in true form tonight- standing on his hind legs and rubbing his back against a large spruce. From my angle, he looked like he was getting his grove on!!

Naturally, I took it as a sign. A blessing of sorts for my journey ahead. 

When I arrived home, I discovered my inbox was full of people in Whistler and the northern Communities offering their help. Which made me cry. Naturally. 

 

Check out the Blogwood Blog with some really nice shots from the No Pipelines, No Tankers Rally in Vancouver about a month ago: http://dogwoodinitiative.org/blog/rally-photo-blog/blogentry_view

On the Line

 An eco-adventure documentary like no other. Follow Frank Wolf and Todd McGowan on a 2,400 km journey by foot, bike, raft and kayak as they seek to uncover the truth about a proposed 5.5 billion dollar oil pipeline.
 
In honour of Earth Day yesterday, Whistler Watch, Whistler Earthsave and I teamed up to screen the documentary film On The Line. Cliff Jennings kindly offered his home as a venue, which was soon filled with people bearing delicious vegan dishes. On offer was lasagna, Mexican 3 layer dip, salads of kale and broccoli, pizza, and an assortment of dips. Dessert was an extravagant affair of chocolate (carob) chip cookies that I made, mini cupcakes, and a banana cream layer cake covered in fruit that well took the cake. Visit Earthsave’s website: http://earthsavewhistler.com/ for photos!
 
After feasting, we soon settled into the impromptu movie theatre to watch the film, shot by Frank Wolf about his journey across BC with his friend Todd McGowan, following the precise route proposed by Enbridge for the Northern Gateway pipeline. They trekked, biked and kayaked, and interviewed people along the way to get their perspectives on the pipeline. Not surprisingly, the few supporters of the project that they spoke to lived in Alberta, primarily those that worked in the oil patch. Many Albertans conveyed that oil and gas is so ingrained in their economy that another pipeline is no big deal. Others, conveyed that they wanted the tar sands development to slow down, at least until solutions are found for potential problems like leaks. BC residents interviewed largely expressed grave concern for their livelihoods (related to commercial fishing) if the pipeline were to ever leak. Many stated that the risks just weren’t worth the few economic gains that their community would accrue with a pipeline. 
 
The countryside that they hiked through, especially as they approached the Coast Mountains was as wild and pristine as it comes. They followed ancient moose trails and swam in crystal clear streams while ascending some steep terrain. Weather socked them in a few times on their trip- meaning there was little to no visibility- and it became apparent that running a pipeline through this area, let alone finding a leak and fixing it, would pose considerable challenges. A leak would certainly go unnoticed until it was affecting people quite a ways down stream, so the damage would already be done. 
 
To my surprise and delight, a tree planting buddy, Rebecca Reeves, was interviewed in the film!  She was the only Albertan they interviewed with a strong voice against the project- ya Reba!! Her parents have a farm that they will most likely sell because of the proximity to the tar sands development. 
 
At the end of the evening, Sara Jennings had us draw the Earth Day commitments we had written on a scrap piece of paper. I had written “Buy Less Stuff” and drew “Visit the David Suzuki website.” Very cool idea- thanks Sara!  
 
Hoping to screen this film again soon, to an even bigger audience. Any suggestions on an inexpensive venue?
 

kimsrunningmonologue

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In a move as predictable as a victim falling prey to a villain in a slasher film, the Harper government has hacked apart the Environmental Review Process, tossing aside 50 years of environmental development and awareness as Suzuki points out:

Check out this CBC interview with David Suzuki: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/04/17/environmental-reviews.html?cmp=Ross

Not only is the federal government reducing the number of departments and agencies that can do environmental reviews from 40 to just 3, it is dramatically shortening the review time to just 24 months.

So the Northern Gateway Review Process could conclude in May, a whole year and half earlier than initially scheduled.

It comes as no surprise as Harper is simply making good on his promise to China to approve the pipelines, “radicals” and “environmentalists” be damned. Apparently wanting clean air and water, sustainable land-based livelihoods, respect for the rule of law and First Nations territories and the ability to trust…

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kimsrunningmonologue

 I’m not the kind of person that goes looking for a fight or a cause. Yes, I am a principled person and have been called “hippie” “tree-hugger” and “environmentalist,” plenty, but I don’t make a point of attending rallies or protests. Yesterday, however, I made my way to Vancouver to stand with thousands of other people that believe the tar sands and pipelines are the wrong choice- now and for the future. Together we stood in solidarity and cried “shame” on our leaders that are choosing greed over good. We listened as thoughtful and passionate speakers, many of them First Nations’ Elders (and one quite well spoke 11 year old!), spoke of the travesty being visited upon the land, and the devastation being wrought in their communities. One Elder said he would never forget something he recalled hearing as a child; “Fish to us is like bread to the white man.”…

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In a move as predictable as a victim falling prey to a villain in a slasher film, the Harper government has hacked apart the Environmental Review Process, tossing aside 50 years of environmental development and awareness as Suzuki points out:

Check out this CBC interview with David Suzuki: http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/04/17/environmental-reviews.html?cmp=Ross

Not only is the federal government reducing the number of departments and agencies that can do environmental reviews from 40 to just 3, it is dramatically shortening the review time to just 24 months.

So the Northern Gateway Review Process could conclude in May, a whole year and half earlier than initially scheduled.

It comes as no surprise as Harper is simply making good on his promise to China to approve the pipelines, “radicals” and “environmentalists” be damned. Apparently wanting clean air and water, sustainable land-based livelihoods, respect for the rule of law and First Nations territories and the ability to trust in our democratic institutions makes us “radicals.”

So a more precarious future awaits us. Meanwhile, Harper makes good on another promise he made: “You won’t recognize Canada when I get through with it.”

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It’s been days and many musings since I last wrote. Lately, it feels like I’m being served up a huge buffet of tasks, with left overs that I just can’t seem to finish; blogging being one of the most lamentable. You’d think my hunger would’ve diminished by now, but I feel like taking action to find alternatives to the tar sands is feeding my soul. Here’s a bit of an update in case you haven’t heard the latest…   

For the past year and half, I have been following the tar sands developments with mounting concern. It began as a distant storm on the horizon of my consciousness that moved in quickly and grew to be a torrent of conviction. Conviction is when the mind and the heart agree upon the truth, and when there is a tsunami of conviction swirling in your gut it wants OUT real bad!! It simply became impossible for me NOT to do something, and that is when this blog was born. 

I began reading more about the impacts of an oil spill, not just on the land, but on our economy and communities. I started listening to TED talks, reporters and analysts all stating in nearly perfect unison that the tar sands are a disaster- literally the largest industrial complex in the world that is accelerating climate change, destroying the boreal forest and causing rising rates of cancer in neighbouring communities.  

It also became abundantly clear that our government has absolutely no intention of listening to the legitimate concerns being raised about the tar sands atrocity and pipeline projects like Enbridge’s Northern Gateway and the one that Kinder Morgan is quietly trying to expand. It became crystal clear that I needed to do more.  

Conversations with thoughtful and compassionate friends helped to reveal my path. I would run across BC this summer, connecting with others to find alternatives to the tar sands. The campaign is called Band Together BC.

Piping and shipping crude from the tar sands threatens so many of our values as British Columbians- clean air and water, pristine ecosystems, vast wilderness and recreational areas, traditional livelihoods, First Nations’ culture and beliefs, tourism and land-based industries, even our democratic process- that many people are taking a stand against building pipelines and allowing oil supertankers to enter the inside passage.

But there are those that work directly and indirectly in the oil and gas industry and are understandably protective of their jobs. There are others that may not know much about the issues and are confused by conflicting reports in the media and statements provided by government spokespeople.

Regardless of my personal standpoint against expanding the tar sands, I think it is critical to hear and share other perspectives with the world. The tar sands is a project that has huge ramifications for all Canadians, therefore it is a conversation to which we should ALL contribute.

So this summer, I will run through the communities located along highway 16 (communities that will perhaps be the most directly impacted by the Northern Gateway pipeline) to capture perspectives via film and social media that will hopefully foster a dialogue (on the ground and virtually) on how we can transition from mining the dirtiest oil in the world to building an economy based on clean renewable energy. It’s not going to happen overnight, but I believe it begins with dialogue. 

Canada currently lacks a national energy strategy. The dearth is being filled by a get rich quick scheme that is stealing our future and pawning it to China (and other eager markets). We need a plan that leads us towards a clean energy future- one in which all of us- including our kids-can prosper.  I believe we all need to be part of creating that plan, to make sure that it truly serves EVERYONE’S needs. 

Together we can and must find ways of creating jobs and revenue that don’t rely on the wholesale destruction of our land and communities. 
 
There is much to be done. Fortunately, there are many passionate, unstoppable people that are doing everything they can to raise awareness and engage people on the tar sands issue. It’s been an affirming, heart expanding experience to connect with total strangers on an issue that is one of the most critical of our time. Everywhere I go, I find my tribe. And while sometimes my heart aches at the dark prospects and the terrifying trajectory we humans have set ourselves upon, I am joyously inspired by the people I’ve met and keep meeting that are envisioning a bright future and taking action to realize that dream. 

 

 

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